All Posts in Outside Of London

April 19, 2018 - Comments Off on Stacey Dennis: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 4

Stacey Dennis: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 4

Best known for her cheeky cards, Leeds born, Stacey Dennis provides us with her hugely inspirational story of her creative start-up and now award-winning business Love Layla. We talk about how she quite literally used her 'skills to pay the bills' and turned 30 quid into a million and why carving out your own path might lead to even bigger and better things.

Excited to introduce the fabulous Stacey Dennis!
Let's get right to it, what University did you got to and to do what?

Leeds Art College & Leeds Met University, studying Design

After finishing formal education what did you do next?
Shortly after graduating, I began my first role within Graphic Design at a Musical
Instrument company based in Leeds. My job was to edit photographs of instruments
and design layouts for the in-house magazine.

How has your career path been shaped over the years?
Amongst various Graphic Design jobs, they were mainly all office based positions. I did break off after a redundancy to travel Australia. This led me to various job roles while backpacking around, but then I landed a position in Sydney working at a Design & Print shop - this was really where I came into more print production, understanding colour process and more technical design.

It was a local business and I became close to the owner who guided me through 9 months of training and development within my skills. Still working as a junior, my Manager was an amazing Illustrator and taught me how to really control design skills throughout the Adobe suite software. On my return to the UK, with my now Australian Husband, I then landed a Managerial position within a similar type of business back in Leeds.

Wow, what a journey!
What have been some of your most difficult obstacles in the workplace?

I think the most difficult obstacles within my career are being a Director of Love Layla. While I still love my job as a Designer, running a business involves job roles that I have zero interest in - such as Accounts. It takes me a long time to understand the sums!

Thankfully, I am super organised so can handle the workload but understanding and throwing yourself into duties that you really have no idea (or interest!) about...

What has been your favourite project to work on?
My favourite projects have always been logo design - throughout my career and having various tasks, I still and always will love designing logos! Simply because they are the “emblem” of someone’s business - there’s a lot riding on that. It’s the pressure I love then...

I did feel really proud and loved designing a sign for our offices -the sign is huge and I have never had to design a sign for myself, that was special.

Starting out, how did you create opportunities for yourself?
I always tried to put myself into everything - I always kept up with trends and found my own style. I was fortunate to gain experience within both print and design - this gave me a better understanding of a finished product when I was designing to send to print.

You have a very family orientated brand and business, who would you thank for helping get where you are?
It's true! The biggest input to my career started with my parents - they would drive me crazy places for crazy equipment/tools/materials to create my designs while at Uni. After them, I would say my boss from my job in Sydney. I was only supposed to be a temp for 3 weeks - 9 months later, I left the country and the job along with the support and advice of a professional who had grown her business from scratch.

So, from Leeds to Sydney to Leeds again, what was it that made you create Love Layla?
Love Layla came about because I was made redundant (again) as I left for maternity leave to have my baby, Layla. I was working as a freelance designer when my husband had a back injury. We were left with £30 and a one year old so I used my skills to pay the bills!

I designed 11 cards for Valentine’s Day and pushed them through Social Media. 3 years later, we stand in a warehouse with 4 members of staff (who are all family) with my husband, Jay, also as a Director. Layla is now 4 years old and we have a huge social media following generating repeat and new custom.

  

Amazing! What would you say has been your biggest achievement to date?
While not to sound too cocksure, my biggest achievement is managing Motherhood and building a successful business turning over £1million in our first year of trading. That was a big year and a proud achievement.

Absolutely, that's incredible. Why do you think the North of England is so special?
Yorkshire Puddings - My Dad is the king of them!

I was born and bred in Leeds and I love being in the North because it’s home! With great cities, we have lots to offer - chips and gravy for one!

What is great about Northern creatives?
There are lots of opportunities worldwide for Creatives, but sometimes they aren’t plausible or practical - so Northern Creatives are able to reach out to the North to assure you that you don’t need to be in the capital to have good ideas - nor do you need to have the skyline backdrop for inspiration.

If you have the eye, determination and drive, it will take you where you want to be.

What does the future hold for 2018?
Continue building our business, generate more designs and products to add to our collection and in general, keep enjoying my work and designing.

What advice would you give to anyone entering the creative industry?
Keep going, it’s not easy. I do find sometimes what looks great to you, isn’t always to someone else - but stick with your gut. Believe in what you do and keep practicing. I have gained a lot of skills through watching and practising video tutorials since I left University and through running my business.

Always think outside of the box, sorry for being cliché - It’s not my usual style, but always look for the not so obvious things in life, they might just lead you to a good thing.

One final thing, who is Twat Cat?
(Laughing) That's our cat and he is Twat Cat.

--

Got a birthday, anniversary, wedding to go to? You know where you're going now.
Discover more of our amazing Champion Northern Creatives here.

April 12, 2018 - Comments Off on Stephen Drummond: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 3

Stephen Drummond: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 3

Stop what you're doing. We went knocking on number 70 for a blog with more amazing things than you can shake a stick at. From Samuel L Jackson to puddles - we've got it all. Neatly wrapped into piece for you to love with all your might.

Meet Owner and Creative Director of Drummond Central, a marketing and communications agency based in Newcastle with clients worldwide. They're one of the top 20 largest agencies outside of London and recognised globally for their creative work.

"We love nothing better than raising the profile of cutting-edge, non-traditional and creatively-minded clients through a considered approach."

You might also know them from...

Let's get cracking, what's you're name and where do you come from (proper Cilla intro!)

I'm Stephen, I'm the Creative Director of Drummond Central, I'm from Newcastle (loud cheering from the crowd) and I started my design life out at Newcastle School of Art and design and followed with a HND in Advertising.

After you finished education, what were your next steps?
Went to London for a year or so, starting as a Junior Art Director to now, CD of my own agency.

That's pretty awesome.
What has been some of your most difficult obstacles in the workplace?

Managing a creative department is the most complex part of my day job.

What has been your favourite project to work on?
There's been loads. We made a horse racing TV commercial recently. We duplicated one horse, numerous times to create a pack. That turned out much better than I thought it would. Amazing actually.

How did you create opportunities for yourself?
Hard work and persistance. Make sure you work harder than everyone in the room. Then make sure work you work harder than everyone in the building etc...

How did you get your first job in the industry?
It was Christmas time and we sent our portfolio in wrapping paper to the CD of Saatchi and Saatchi in London. He called us back within 15 minutes.

Amazing! What has been your biggest achievement to date at work?
Filming commercials with Samuel L Jackson at Universal Studios, Hollywood.

WOW! I'm not quite sure how to follow that?
What do you think is special about the North of England?
Everything you could ever need; history, the coast, great nightlife etc... is on the doorstep. Plus, Northern creatives have a good work ethic, they're witty and grounded.

What's your next big goal?
Keep getting better. Have more fun!

What advice would you give to anyone entering the industry?
Work harder than everyone else. Listen!

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Check out more of Drummond Central's work here.
Read more about our Champion Northern Creatives, here.

April 5, 2018 - Comments Off on Nick Entwistle: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 2

Nick Entwistle: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 2

From starting his first business working from his dining room table at just 16 with his 12-year-old brother to beating Bieber to a Christmas Number 1, this lad from Stockport has gone from strength to strength, I asked him to sum up his career in just 1-minute:

Meet Nick Entwistle, Creative Director at Trunk and Founder of One Minute Briefs.

Thanks for being in our Champion Northern Creatives. Let's get right in!
After finishing formal education what did you do next?

I had already done numerous work placements during my course so I had a job offer in place for when I left (Liverpool John Moores) University. This was at Driven in Wilmslow working on ads for Vimto, webuyanycar.com, Carcraft amongst other brands.

How has your career path been shaped over the years?

Since then, I left after a couple of years along with my creative partner to take a job at McCann Manchester. Here I spent a few years working on the likes of Aldi, American Airlines, Nestle, Royal Mail, N-Power & Cross Country Trains.

I then left to go freelance for a year working mainly at McCann Birmingham on Miele, Evans Halshaw, Vauxhall and Bentley. I also worked as a CD at Big Brand Ideas. In this time I also worked at Leeds agency Propaganda and Edinburgh agency Leith on Irn Bru.

I then worked freelance at Magnafi as I moved more into film. One of my first jobs was the music video and campaign for the NHS which resulted in us beating Bieber to Xmas Number 1.

I took on a full-time Creative Director role there, working on campaigns for Missguided, Betfred, Very.co.uk and Sofology. And, just recently, I moved to Trunk. We work with agencies to collaborate on making engaging content.

Cool! What has been some of your most difficult obstacles in the workplace?

Processes within some of the bigger agencies can sometimes stifle creativity and stop you being agile and responsive. In today's world, you need to be quick and be able to produce ideas and content fast without getting left behind. This is why I like to work within smaller teams and be involved in the process from start to finish, working with a talented team that works together to make things happen.

What has been your favourite project to work on?

The NHS campaign was very intense but extremely rewarding. To see the campaign grow from a one minute idea into a music video that reached number 1 and got played after the Queen's speech was incredible and something I will never forget. It also put a huge statement out to the powers that be that the public won't let the NHS die.

Amazing! When you first started, how did you create opportunities for yourself?

I think it's important as a creative to have a brand and a point of difference. It's not easy to remember a name. And, you need to get your work seen. I have done this with the Bank of Creativity, Agency Quotes and One Minute Briefs, but it all started with the story below...

When I was 16 and started college, I decided I didn’t want to create a portfolio of work. I decided I was going to run a Graphic Design company.

I called it NE-Design. You know… NE-Time. NE-Place. NE-Idea. Punny right?

But my approach got me noticed. I emailed local companies and sure enough one came along with a brief to redesign their logo and website.

It was a huge engineering firm turning over a lot of money and here was little old me inviting the boss over to the NE-Design ‘office’ which was, in fact, my family’s dining room.

I asked my mum to stay in the kitchen whilst I had the meeting.

When I opened the door to this big CEO, he must have been shocked as I’d given no clue previously to my age. He was in for even more of a shock when I took him through to the office to meet my web developer… who, of course, was my 12-year-old brother.

Some people would have walked out there and then…but we reassured him that we’d create some great work for him.

And, we did. Earning a nice bit of pocket money for ourselves in the process.

By saying I was a business, rather than a college student, I changed the perception of what I was. And this became who I was. Because you are who you say you are.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. The most important work you do is the work you do to get people to look at the work you do.

Love it - This might be the best start-up story I've ever heard!
Who would you thank for helping get where you are?

Gary Fawcett of TBWA Manchester was a big help for me. I had a book crit with him. At the time, he couldn't give me a job, but he gave me loads of contacts and one of them was Driven. I still speak to Gary to this day and I think it's very important to keep in touch and remain thankful to people who get you where you are. I thank the tutors from uni. The course was a very good one as you didn't see your tutor for ten mins once every two weeks. They helped you as much as possible and pushed you to be industry ready by getting out there.

I'd thank the Creative Directors at all the agencies I have worked for pushing me to create better work and I'd thank Simon Lewis and Jon Butler for giving me the opportunities to take on Creative Director roles with them. I'd also thank my good friend Adam Britton who I work closely with at Trunk now as we look to achieve great things. There have been plenty more people along the way too, especially the OMBLES. Without them, One Minute Briefs wouldn't exist. It's become an incredible community of people who help each other creatively and as friends.

Absolutely! Let's talk more about One Minute Briefs, how did you originally come up with the idea/concept for OMB?

It started when we had about 7 weeks on a uni project. As we all know, that's unrealistic in industry. And, I don't work well with long deadlines. So, of course, myself and my creative partner decided to try and crack a brief in One Minute!

One of us did a good one. One of us did a shit one. Which was great as we realised you can actually come up with a good idea when you're thinking is restricted by time but at the same time de-restricted as you can put anything down on the paper.

It was also a lot of fun and our course mates started to get involved. We then put it on Twitter and opened up to the public by setting a brief every day. Slowly but surely, people started to get involved and the community has grown to 15.5 thousand followers in the last few years.

What has been your biggest work/OMB achievement to date?

The NHS campaign was a big one but I feel that the viral Isabella C-word film we recently created is the biggest. From a one minute idea, we were able to write a script for a film featuring Neuroblastoma sufferer Isabella herself.

The film has been seen by over 20 million people and featured in national press and TV news coverage. It has also raised tens of thousands of pounds towards her target. Could one minute help save someone's life? That would be the best achievement ever.
By combining the expertise of our team along with the support of the OMBLES, we were able to achieve something great together as a team.

What do you think is special about the North of England?

We don't have to get the Tube! That's the main thing. The North is great as we have got some great agencies producing quality work. We don't get the budgets London agencies do but that just means it's more of a challenge.

I'm from the North and have had opportunities to go to London but I like it here. We have the best football teams here in Manchester too. Particularly my beloved Man City!

I'm a firm believer that great work can be produced anywhere and with the transport links and technology available these days, I don't see why that shouldn't be here.

What has been your experience with working in a traditional team?

Traditional agencies are sometimes set in their ways and can't adapt to new technology and respond to opportunities quickly. That's why I like to work with people who have the same mindset and are always looking to create something new and make a difference within the industry.

What's your next big goal? What does the future hold for 2018?

I am making a film for Multiple Sclerosis sufferers which I want to have big reach and create an impact this year. I've created an OMBoard as I look to push One Minute Briefs even bigger.

And, I want to create some amazing work with the Trunk team.

What advice would you give to anyone entering the industry?

• Create a brand for yourself.
• Stand out from the other graduates. They are your rivals.
• Don't wait until you graduate to make contacts.
• Believe in yourself.
• Do great work.
• Make Creative Directors wish they had thought of the ideas you are showing them.

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Want to read more of our Northern Creatives series? Check our Part 1 from Michelle Pegg.

March 17, 2018 - Comments Off on Michelle Pegg: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 1

Michelle Pegg: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 1

After recent expansion the YCC are proud operate in London, Amsterdam, Berlin, New York and Newcastle. My part in the YCC is reppin' the North of England and Scotland and I'm extremely proud of my Northern roots. I want to share with you not only why we're canny mint* but also share the stories and highlights of some of the region's most talented, brilliant and all-round awesome dudes and dudettes at the top of their creative game.

Without further ado please enjoy Part 1 of our Champion Northern Creatives, starting with a woman who I'm sure I've seen manifest another set of arms to complete deadlines, she's actually squeezed the 25th hour into a day and was responsible for chucking me my first permanent design role... some years ago. Meet Michelle Pegg, Founder and Creative Director of Curate Creative in Newcastle.

Michelle! Thanks for agreeing to meet with me today in the uber-cool, Pink Lane Coffee in Newcastle.

No problems, Adele!

Tell me a little more about how you got into the creative industry.

I went to Newcastle College to study Graphic Design and when I finished I went to Edinburgh for work experience, which eventually led to a Junior Graphic Designer position. So I accidentally ended up staying there for 5-years working as a Graphic Designer within ad agencies as well as interior design companies which gave me a massive range of skills.

Ahh yes, working across different sectors can give you different perspectives and disciplines which you might not find if you stick to one particular niche.

Exactly, if you don't know what to do, just give it a go and figure it out. Say yes to everything. I believe having flexible skills and a give-it-a-go attitude has kept me in work all these years.

What was the most difficult hurdle you had to overcome to become a creative/get into the creative industry?

Probably getting that first placement. My first one was working in a really small company with small businesses and charity organisations for clients, which was good because it taught me how to work with smaller/tighter budgets.

Would you say that forced you to be more creative?

Well yes, you need to think about where the creative could best have impact and stand out without the huge budgets of TV, radio or print ads.

What has been one of your favourite or most fun projects across the board? Regardless of budget?

Recently I got to work on a campaign for Virgin Active, which meant we could work on radio, online TV, press, social, events, snapchat, Instagram, Facebook - so many avenues to get the message across and to create something really fun but effective for our client. We worked with a media agency which meant the channels we worked with could have the best impact and we had great fun working with the production company and radio team too. Seeing the idea through from the start to the finish was really important. As well as ultimately helping to increasing sales and awareness. It was the most successful campaign they've ran in 6 years which we’re pretty proud of!

Amazing, design however pretty needs function - something you've always drilled into me.

Exactly, it needs to get a message across, have a purpose, provoke a reaction. Whether that’s to help drive sales, get people in the door, to read something or to sign up with their data, and when you get pulled in different directions it's good to go back to that core idea/goal. If it doesn't do that, we haven't done our jobs properly.

What was your experience with working collaboratively with other agencies like that?

When everyone's working towards the same end goal it's great - you're obviously working for the client but also as an agency and individuals you want to shine with the ideas and results you create.

After leaving agencies you went out on your own - what was the build up to that like?

After several years at various agencies as well as in-house experience, when I left my last post, I just felt it was the time for me to try and make a go of it on my own. Even though it was pretty scary. I started by testing the water with the contacts I had built up over the years and went from there. The thing I found was the freedom was great but you also might find it restrictive too as you're only one person with a set amount of hours in the day. I wanted to build on this and work on all sorts of projects of all sizes, which is why I founded Curate with my business partner David - to build a great team and grow and not feel restricted. We’ve found collaborating and bringing in key people on specific projects really works too as no two projects are the same, we make sure we bring in the right skills to get the best results for the job in hand.

Combining forces, nice! What did you learn from being on your own?

Being quite frank, being on your own means you can make your own decisions. There's no one to have to compromise with, but on the flip side there's no one to bounce ideas off either. Your'e always in the driving seat running your own business or as a freelancer and that can be scary... but in a good way! Pushing you on to the next job because you need to know you have work coming in and also maintain what you have. Working with David and founding our business means any problems are shared as well as having more time to utilise and work on even more cool things!

So, now you need more people and more desks?

Yes! We have a heaps of Scandinavian boxes needing unpacked back at the office. Now we're looking for people to join the team.

One thing I will say is I’ve had the privilege throughout my career so far to work with some amazing, determined and very talented people so far. Whatever stage of their careers they’ve been, working with a team that just click and support each other so well is a lucky position to be in. For which I’ll always be thankful for and we all know we’re always here for each other wherever we are. You never lose that. I’d love to have that same camaraderie, that special something that just works in this new team.

*Touching moment, Adele is holding back the tears*
We have discussed in the past the importance of having your own creative outlets. You were a massive part of the Northern Correspondent (Northern based magazine) weren't you?

Yes, I don’t like to pigeon hole myself! Even now I consult and get involved in projects that I feel are important or excite me. I joined the Northern Correspondent team a few years ago simply because I wanted to get involved with something outside of my day to day work that wasn’t as commercially driven, but was creative and inspiring. I love magazines, and the Northern Correspondent was a great way of telling stories about the North in a long-form journalism magazine.

I joined early on as Art Director/Designer of the magazine and worked with Ian Wylie (leader of the project) and Chris Stokel Walker producing several issues that involved local writers, journalists, artists, illustrators, photographers and poets. And we distributed issues for sale via a launch event for each issue which was in the form of a discussion on various topics, one of which was part of the Northern Design Festival where we held an event with talks and discussions entitled People and Print - Where ideas create communities.

We also distributed via a fantastic network of local bookshops, coffee shops, and art galleries across the north. Co-ordinating all of this was an excellent way of meeting a whole range of very talented individuals who all kindly contributed their skills to help get those stories out there. It was a not for profit project so no one made money from it, but it was valuable in so many ways and I’m very glad I was able to be a part of it.

Amazing, as a creative if you find something you love you need to pursue it!

It’s so true that you have to find ways of doing the things that you love and enjoy, they don’t just land at your feet. And once you start doing these things and getting involved, and just trying things, you never know where it will lead.

Published by: Adele in Ad-vice, Opinion, Outside Of London

March 16, 2018 - Comments Off on Because not everyone’s a Friends fan

Because not everyone’s a Friends fan

I grew up in a small Cornish market town.

At school the only subjects I enjoyed (and was any good at) were the creative ones.

Y’kno the subjects other kids did for ‘fun’ or to avoid written exams.

Well art was my thing.

And I had no idea what kind of job it would get me.

To be honest, I don’t think my school did either.

If anything, it seemed like creative jobs didn’t exist... unless you wanted to be an artist or the next Mrs Schooling (my art teacher) ...

...which I did not, (sorry Miss).

BUT

one day, whilst watching Friends.

Season 9, episode 11 to be exact – thanks google.

I was introduced to a world beyond artist, or art teacher.

Chandler Bing had given up his job in whatever he did (who knows) to give copywriting a go.

Cheese – it’s milk that you chew.

And

A grape, because who can get a watermelon in your mouth.

Became my first real-ish insight into the ad-world.

Yeah, I’d seen ads on TV but the idea of advertising being one of those real-life job things – well, this was a first.

A quick google of ‘advertising degree courses’ and fast forward 4 years I’m graduating with a 2:1 in Advertising and Brand Communication from UCA, Farnham.

Fast forward another 8 years and I’m now a copywriter at a global advertising agency.

BUT

I can’t help thinking what if 16 year-old-me hated Friends? – I mean, some people do...

...some very strange people

And what about those 16-year-olds now – they’re not watching Friends.

So how are they meant to find out about the creative industry?

Yeah, we’re spending a lot of time visiting universities, myself included.

We’re talking to students who have already decided advertising is for them – great.

But no one is talking to school kids.

The ones that have absolutely no idea what they want to do.

Who have no idea of the possibilities that exist within the creative industry.

And if they are, I can’t imagine they’re talking to people like 16-year-old-me 254 miles away from London, in a town where creativity is seen as a hobby, not a career.

There’s a lot of talk right now about diversity, and rightly so.

Our industry is still dominated by white, privileged males. Although, I must caveat my art director falls into that category, and he’s f**king brilliant, so this isn’t a man hating exercise at all.

But

How are we meant to create change if we’re still hiring from the same places.

And talking to the same people.

Even the universities we’re visiting are usually the same ones within an hour train journey outside of London.

Why aren’t we casting the net further?

We should be talking to other courses, not just advertising ones.

We should be visiting schools and colleges, and not just ones near our office.

We should be supporting initiatives like D&AD New Blood Shift, Jolt Academy, The Ideas Foundation, A New Direction, Rare London, Creative Equals and The Creative Circle Foundation.

This year we, the YCC, have made it our mission to step outside the bubble that is London and get on the road to speak to students across the country about how incredible the creative industry is, and the opportunities that exist within it.

So far, this year we’ve spoken at universities in Leeds, Lincoln, & Essex.

We’re starting up conversations with schools, colleges and more universities outside of London.

And I’ll be heading back to my old art college in Plymouth and my secondary school in Cornwall, in hope to inspire someone like 16-year-old-me.

Because not everyone’s a Friends fan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 4, 2018 - Comments Off on Meet Newcastle BANG! BANG! Event Sponsors, Komodo Digital

Meet Newcastle BANG! BANG! Event Sponsors, Komodo Digital

Komodo Digital is a team that thrives on new challenges and strives to work with the latest technology, from drones to artificial intelligence. They're a work hard, play hard bunch, where they take their client work seriously and themselves less so.

I caught up with and their Commercial Director, Armin Talić, to talk about Northern talent, apprenticeships and how you can stand out from the crowd when it comes to securing a role in the creative industry.

Would you agree the North is a great place for creative talent?

The North nurtures great creative talent through university, we're producing very strong candidates to enter the industry... however, what I’d love to see more of is opportunities in the North for us to retain this amazing talent.

Good point, there needs to be the job availability to help our graduate retention. What would you like to see more of in the North to support young creatives coming through?

Scrap the current 'apprenticeship' model for creative businesses... it's a funding farse and SMEs simply can't offer credible or structure experiences for candidates. I'd replace current incentives with performance based grants. If a business is performing well from P&L, their funding should be much lower than that of a business struggling. This should be coupled with regional insentives for large businesses to engage with SMEs in their region.

Interesting! How do you as a business support graduates and/or collage students?

We offer 1 placement per year for a student to work with our team. They're on-boarded like a Junior, with the same direct support associated with that role. We don't hold their hand and don't expect too much from them either. We partner with Northumbria University, via a partnership with Jamie Steane, to engage with and source the best candidates from their design degrees each year. Our 2 most recent design hires have been through this partnership and have lead to exceptional candidates joining the team.

Why is taking part in events such as the YCC’s BANG! BANG! so important to Komodo Digital?

As much as we try to build a studio that people want to work at, we also need to maintain a profile in our industry. Partnering with fantastic organisations like YCC allows us to build mindshare amongst candidates actively seeking new opportunities. In short, it's hard to be somewhere that people want to work, if no one knows about us.

What advice would you give to young creatives looking to get into the industry?

Create a strong portfolio of work outside of your academic course work. Challenges like "Daily UI" are a good start and provide structured encouragement. The best employers look for the best candidates, so you should think about gaining experience outside of your discipline to better understand the wider implications of your work.

Big businesses will give you a very different experience than small businesses. If you want to learn under your own steam, then joining a smaller and more agile team might be a good place to start.

Find out more about Komodo Digital here, discover new job opportunities and join us at Campus North 20th March.

Published by: Adele in Ad-vice, Outside Of London

February 8, 2018 - Comments Off on BANG! BANG! No.3 | Newcastle

BANG! BANG! No.3 | Newcastle

What do you get when you put the North East's finest creative minds in one place, for one night only?

BANG! BANG! No.3.

Our BANG! BANG! events are designed around creative problem solving, under a really tight deadline. Creatives are split into teams, given a problematic brief and then the clock starts. You have less than an hour to come up with a solution to the brief using any technology, advertising, world-shakingly awesome concepts and then you get to pitch your idea to the rest of the room.

Things you'll want to know.

• There will be booze.
• There will be fun.
• There will be a chance to work with brilliant people.

For students/juniors/creative minds - you'll get to speak and work with some of the regions leading Creative Directors, after they've had a beer you can start mentioning that you're looking for a job.

For agencies - you'll get to work alongside some really cool students and mention you have a placement and/or job that they might be interested in.

For anyone that likes to network, have creative fun or drink beer for £4 - just bring ideas and make new friends.

GET TICKETS

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If you have any questions about the event get in touch with adele@youngcreativecouncil.com

ABOUT OUR SPONSOR, KOMODO DIGITAL
Komodo Digital are a digital studio based in Newcastle, working with clients across the UK, Europe and beyond. Delivering innovative, agile digital solutions to forward-thinking organisations.

Published by: Adele in Events, Live Briefs, Outside Of London

August 25, 2017 - Comments Off on #CopywritersUnite Manchester

#CopywritersUnite Manchester

Last week I popped by the Copywriters Unite meet up in Manchester. Hosted by the lovely Megan Wright, the evening saw a host of wordy creatives flock to Manchester bar Ply, for a good old beer and natter!

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July 21, 2017 - Comments Off on The Art in Storytelling

The Art in Storytelling

We all love to tell a story, We all love to hear a story – and hey, we’re in the business of storytelling (who isn’t these days?). But since ‘the story’ has superseded ‘the big idea’ and ‘the journey’ how do we tell the difference between a good story and a bad story and more importantly how do we sell it?

Well fortunately for us, last night we trekked on down to the SheSays event ‘Finding Great Stories’ at Barker on Wall Street, New York. I guess you could say this is a story, to explain that story, about how to sell the best story.

Are you sitting comfortably?

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June 27, 2017 - Comments Off on Manchester’s School Of Thought is back

Manchester’s School Of Thought is back

So the return of Manchester’s mini ad school is upon us, and this time they’ve got two programmes. Their course for students and grads is taking applications as we speak, and it's on closing this Friday, so you better get cracking.

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