All Posts in creative

July 5, 2018 - Comments Off on Shiny Career Surgeries

Shiny Career Surgeries

One of the hardest things starting out is getting feedback from the people who might potentially hire you. Getting in front of thought leaders to hear their opinion of what works and even more crucially what doesn't.

The Shiny Awards are putting on an event this month that gives you the opportunity to hear exactly what these thought leaders think. They've pulled together a panel from Boiler Room 4:3, Universal Music, Warner Bros, Caviar and Stink to give filmmakers feedback on their work and next-steps career advice.

After the panel session there'll be networking drinks with the panel and all attendees, giving audience members the chance to network too.

If you're a filmmaker you can apply here.

If you'd love to be in the audience we've been given a special discount on tickets for YCC. To claim, click to buy a £15 audience ticket and apply the discount code YCC, the audience ticket will then cost £10.

When: Tues 17th July, 7pm - 9.30pm
Where: Stink, London
More info: here.

July 5, 2018 - Comments Off on sensei

sensei

se. xx

#garethsouthgatewould patiently read this whole post and promptly go about ticking off every item on it. so be like gareth and you'll win the world cup too, guys

 

TOUCH

Raf Simons set up a permanent camp in my admiring heart not just via the anemic pastels and shoulder pads with albatross-sized wingspans in his Fall 2018 show back in February, nor through his “dad shoe” (heavy Audi edition) collab with Adidas, and NOT EVEN with CK 205W39NYC’s latest collection taking preppy to the next level with all its shameless Ivy League branding. It was, in fact, in his appearance the film Dior and I. Spoiler alert: he cries, I cried. The documentary followed the designer’s first collection as creative director at the major French label we all know and love, founded by one serious Anglophile. Anyway, this emotional journey of me and Raf is all but a precursor to the V&A’s announcement that they will host the largest Christian Dior exhibition IN HISTORY next year. So we’ve got a long time to gnaw on our nails in anticipation - tickets will be available in September. Make sure you bag ‘em.


SMELL

The summer vibes are falling on us heavy like a plague of flying ants. Oh wait that’s not even a simile that’s ACTUALLY HAPPENING IN ZONE 1 RN. Ignore the sensation of bugs on your face with another scent o’ summer which is everyone’s favourite kitschy 70s apéritif - NO, not YOU, Aperol, we’ve had more than enough of you - Campari!!! Get a sensible dose of Red Passion at this new exhibition of the Italian bevvy’s classik advertising posters dating from the 1920s all the way through to hippie-era 60s. Down it, fresha.


HEAR
BBC Radio 4’s Reith Lectures for 2018 have begun, kicking off with historian Margaret MacMillan exploring humanity’s twisted and complicated relationship with war. If you’re not the type to listen live on ‘the wireless’ then download the talks instead. Makes for more educational listening than jamming to Juice Wrld on the Victoria line AGAIN, with all his cheap samples and melodic rap A.K.A. everything people will tell you is wrong with hip hop today. But give yourself ten mins anyway to enjoy the vid for it by Cole Bennett, the animator famous for backing lo-fi Soundcloud traxsters, like Natalie or Black Papa. If you’re the type who likes <500 plays on your music then you about to cream, son. And if you’re not careful you gonna end up with Famous Dex. Music wormholes ftw.

TASTE

Mortadella parties!!! Who knew entire soirées could be devoted to the pale pink foodstuffs that kinda looks like salmonella on a stick but other people have said it’s edible sooooo away you munch! (gotta love social norms, right?) Bright Restaurant, the new very well-received opening up in London Fields, is gonna be kicking back this Sunday with Federico Orsi for some meaty plundering on his Romagnola pigs that are fed on barley, fava and wild herbs. Meat taste guuuuud.

 

SEE

Clips from the K hole? On second thoughts, no thx, but if you want to get pretty damn close check out the selection of moving image works by artists from visual arts society The London Group in a series entitled ‘Altered States’. Someone cue Ron Trent. If you missed it during the Waterloo Festival that just passed then no fear, because you can catch up on the action on their Vimeo.

 

@larabaxter 

June 25, 2018 - Comments Off on Creative Stories From Cannes

Creative Stories From Cannes

Can you get enough of Cannes? If you can't we've got a jolly good treat lined up for you to keep Cannes going for another few weeks at least.

Creative Social are hosting their annual Cannes round-up and as per usual it's unmissable. It's not till the 18th July so there's still time to get tickets. RIGHT HERE.

The lovely lot from Creative Social have also given us two tickets to give to two lucky emailers. So if you fancy risking it ping an email to holly@youngcreativecouncil.com all we ask is that you take some snaps and give us a write-up to share with the unlucky ones who didn't win or get tickets in time.

Be sure to get in quick cos it's always a sell-out. The only thing we can't guarantee is free-flowing rose wine.

See you there!

 

 

 

 

June 20, 2018 - Comments Off on sensei

sensei

se. xix

tired? you can't be Crashing as hard as Lee Bul at the Hayward Gallery though, get down to the immersive fancies there to prove me wrong

SEE
A big floating thing has appeared on the water outside the Serpentine Gallery. It’s a new piece from Christo A.K.A one half of Christo and Jeanne-Claude, up there with the Coolest Couples Of All Time and famed for their monumental outdoor art. 20 metres tall and weighing in at 600 metric tonnes, this 3D trapezium of scaffolding-esque piping barrels is already sending LDN into a spin, exhibit A being the Serpentine swimmers who are complaining that the sculpture’s shadow has left them ‘doing lengths in the gloom’. Yeah, that’s what you get from the type of people who exercise in Kensington. Go down to Hyde Park ends to (a) see the sculpture (b) hopefully feel at total peace and (c) throw eggs at said swimmers.

TASTE

Booma Booma Booma Booma, I want you in my rooma. Yes, cheap Vengaboys fun always go down a treat. Knew you’d like that one. This Brixton establishment pairs modern Indian füds with ⅓ pints of craft beer, ooh whee we are smiling WIDE. In other newz, Night Tales is back, and it’s biting hard. Their new, permanent venue will open in July on Hackney’s Bohemia Place, and I got exhausted just reading about all its new features/bars/restaurants/DJs. Watch this space for empty house beats, people drenching their souls with prosecco, fusion food parading as something original and a general stifling air of pretension. I genuinely can’t wait.

TOUCH

Around this time last year, supercomputer AI extraordinaire IBM Watson learnt what it meant for a sporting moment to be “worthwhile” just from being fed past data, and then managed to create a Wimbledon highlights video all on its ownsome. Nice one. But just touch wood the machines aren’t taking over soon, because this year, they’re learning to answer back. Watson just took part in a debate club in San Francisco, and was not too shabby at all. General consensus was that the delivery was shit (think they just need to reprogram the voice to sound like ) but the content had a lot more  So you can stop abusing Siri now, her - his? are machines gender fluid or neutral? - comebacks are gonna beat yours to a pulp. Probably already are tbh.

 

HEAR

So I guess 2k18 is the year of the 23-minute album. Nas’ new wun NASIR, Pusha T’s DAYTONA, Kanye’s infamous ye and collab with Cudi on KIDS SEE GHOSTS, The Carters’ (pushing it at 38 minutes) Everything is Love. We're drowning in the half-hour hip hop. And the general opinion - spread wider than butter on a Turkish carpet - of the eternally snarky public is that these releases all, comically, somehow happen to be each artist’s most mediocre work, EVER. They’re all so average, so wildly average that you can’t help but wonder whether maybe they’re all in cahoots. Maybe they’ve all purposefully made TV-show-length work to try and tell us that no art was made in a 30-minute episode. Or maybe they’ve had enough of being these borderline musical genii and are taking a stand to show that they’re people too, and they’re allowed to make 5/10 average shit. Or maybe, we all just need to sit back and relax a bit, because not every rhyme needs to go where no rhyme has gone before, and you should be allowed to sing about certain themes but forget to mention key refs, and this loop is allowed to be as catchy as Taylor Swift, and yes, you CAN re-use samples from 7 years ago. I think we all know what happens when we get too angsty about giving a good performance, and if you’ve somehow forgotten then England playing in the World Cup is here to remind you. So consider the Era of Fucking Average royally christened, which is not quite a Dark Age of lyricism but definitely somewhere in the Dull Taupe region.

SMELL

Croissants? Croisette? Are you frolicking in Cannes, or just with a can of La Croix in your PJs at home, watching Sasha Lane’s IG stories, eating Richmond chicken sausages and begging someone to come over to help nurse your hangover? In that case make sure you keep UTD (an abbreviation I’ll leave you to work out) with watagwan at this year’s Lions festival, as well as watching everyone on the YDA shortlist and Saatchi & Saatchi’s New Director’s Showcase. But start off with this interview with Sir John Hegs that does that unusual thing that only the advertising industry seems to do, which is continuously talk about how everything needs to change, but shows no significant shifts in any direction… the baton is yours, friends. Take that mother and beat the shit out of advertising.

 

@larabaxter

May 16, 2018 - Comments Off on sensei

sensei

se. xviii

feeling rubbish about your creative output? can't be as bad as that abysmal DC ad written for millennials by old white men, right? refresh your memory and not your palate with how NOT to live your life here

 

HEAR

Definitely not the Arctic Monkeys’ new album. That’s harsh, I haven’t listened to it, I’m making a snap judgement because I’m a bitter millennial and don’t think life is ever going to get any better than it did in Any Suburban Park in Summer 09, or perhaps cranked off our collective nut on a sofa in second year. And if anyone even begins to start uttering the sound “Child-” you know EXACTLY what’s coming music-wise (and good on you, because it’s a tune to end many tunes and a video that’s even better, we heart you Hiro our hero). So in that case, give your ear-hairs a groom with the Iranian-Dutch beats of Sevdaliza. If you’re liking her new release Humana then make sure you hark back to her 2017 album Ison. And if you need a quick dose of whatever it is that gets you through the day then your toenails will crumble during the very first bars of this RIPPER by John Tejada, and then you can watch the master at werk during his live set at the LA Mixmag Lab. It’ll keep your week happy, trus meh.

TOUCH

Touch an actual object and not just a glaring screen that warns of our slow decline into losing use of our fingertips' nerve endings because we haven’t needed to be tactile in years. OK maybe ahead of myself there but issuez gotta be raised, right? South London Gallery is hosting a LGBTQIA book fair which will no doubt be a trove of independently published queer fiction, political writing and critical insights, and actual printed matter to have and to HOLD. Workshops and talks to go with em too, so head down on the 25th and 26th May, at least just to appreciate the title with its echoes of Zoe Leonard’s beautiful 1992 artwork for David Wojnarowicz.

 

SEE

Curzon Cinemas are doing a Nick Cave film series because, well why the shit not, he touches people in a way a crummy indie arthouse film cannot. They kick it off on the 22nd May with the 1987 Wim Wenders film Wings of Desire, and it only gets more crooning from there. Grab tix before he grabs u.

SMELL

That fresh layer of paint, yuh. The Royal Academy re-opens on the 19th May (totally fine if you didn’t even realise it was shut) to celebrate its 250th birthday the only way a gallery knows how: with a fuckload of art stuffs. So head down 19th/20th for some drop-in printmaking workshops, spoken word performances and communal flag-flying. Yes. And to keep your bellies full as well as your left brains, there’ll be street food and cocktail bars all weekend, like The Ginistry and Mother Clucker. Peckham-based creative collective BORN N BREAD will be throwing an after party (a demure 10pm finish ofc) with DJs, live performances and immersive installations (obviously).

 

TASTE

I say Danish, you say… hygge? The crusty yogs in Christiania? Organic open rye sandwiches? Blatant and unapologetic clichés? Mais oui. Feed your baitness at modern Danish restaurant Snaps + Rye with some finely flavoured arctic char, pickled fennel, trout paté and, OMG, buttermilk panna cotta. PS GUESS WHAT it’s in West London. Golborne Road, u hav my back and my backing.

And if it’s somehow possible to drink rosé unironically, here’s the place to do it: their 2015 French bottle is a smooth treat. Oooh, I sounded borderline connoisseur there.

I know you don’t need telling I’m not.

@larabaxter

April 25, 2018 - Comments Off on sensei

sensei

se. xvii

we had a brief and flirtatious summer weekend just there, but it's over now, and you know what that means? it's time to start drafting your ideas for PARODY CHRISTMAS CAMPAIGNS (obviously) because, as in AdLandLife, these will take 6+ months to perfect (using the word 'perfect' liberally)

 

SEE

Do those eye bogies need scratching? No fear. Thomas Mailaender exhibits his contemporary photography at Michael Hoppen Gallery - he was taken on by Louis Vuitton a while back and he developed the ONLY existing method of printing leather within the fabric, as opposed to simply on the surface. Dat’s some deep dye. His “fun archaeological” objects are on display too; they read like physical meme humour and will genuinely make you lol a lil. Also not to be missed are rounds of Peckham’s current shows - Alastair Levy at Lily Brooke, ‘Instant Excess’ at Rod Barton, Magali Reus at SLG and Caterina Silva at Bosse & Baum.

Caterina Silva.

Thomas Mailaender.

 

TOUCH

The glittery giant otherwise known as awards season is almost upon us, and things are kicking off this week with D&AD, whose famed pencils always find their way to work that’s both killer creative and slightly off the big-brand beaten track. With the first wave of winners announced on Monday and more on the way this week in tandem with the festival, there’s going to be plenty of creative brain candy for you to induce indigestion with. And if you didn’t manage to get your grubby hands on tickets (or a pencil), the coverage will come in thick and fast on social media, and make sure you check back to their site regularly to get some award-winning inspo. Studio Hato’s ace identity for this year is also worth a cobbles.


HEAR

From the 2015 album ‘Theory of Flo’, Auntie Flo proves that although 3 years in music is tantamount to a lifetime in genre evolution, there is such thing as a timeless classic these days, and no better example than this banger with Anbuley. If you’re rendered speechless by those beats as well as the dystopian stylings of Chloé, bag yourself un billet to Printworks this Saturday for a line-up that rivals the South-East London establishment’s light system in terms of blinding. DJ Koze will be spinning tracks from his upcoming LP ‘Knock Knock’ which, if the first release from it is anything to go by, you’re gonna have a stamping good night.

 

 

TASTE

Since somehow managing to exhaust all the food options at Pop Brixton, Flat Iron Square, Dinerama and (easily enough) The Prince, and now being in dire need of that sweet heaven of washing down hot, fresh munch with overpriced draught beer, nirvana has been found in the sprawling Elephant & Castle space Mercato Metropolitano. They do miso ramen, sourdough pizzas and steak & chorizo on sweet potato fries that will catapult your eyes to the size of NEPTUNE. If only yalls’ stomachs were that big. Also just opened is Mare Street Market up in ol’ Hackers, but good luck finding a seat among the “creative industry clones” and adorbz dogs that are only ever held in the crooks of arms.

 

SMELL

Fashion reeks of guilt. Guilt of encouraging twisted beauty ideals, guilt of nurturing unhealthy, stressful and ostracising work cultures, and - perhaps one of the most recent revelations - guilt of destroying the planet through questionable production processes and widespread child labour. Then what better way to address this through a blunt, exhaustive and informative exhibition at the V&A? Atta girl, fashion.

 

@larabaxter

April 19, 2018 - Comments Off on Stacey Dennis: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 4

Stacey Dennis: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 4

Best known for her cheeky cards, Leeds born, Stacey Dennis provides us with her hugely inspirational story of her creative start-up and now award-winning business Love Layla. We talk about how she quite literally used her 'skills to pay the bills' and turned 30 quid into a million and why carving out your own path might lead to even bigger and better things.

Excited to introduce the fabulous Stacey Dennis!
Let's get right to it, what University did you got to and to do what?

Leeds Art College & Leeds Met University, studying Design

After finishing formal education what did you do next?
Shortly after graduating, I began my first role within Graphic Design at a Musical
Instrument company based in Leeds. My job was to edit photographs of instruments
and design layouts for the in-house magazine.

How has your career path been shaped over the years?
Amongst various Graphic Design jobs, they were mainly all office based positions. I did break off after a redundancy to travel Australia. This led me to various job roles while backpacking around, but then I landed a position in Sydney working at a Design & Print shop - this was really where I came into more print production, understanding colour process and more technical design.

It was a local business and I became close to the owner who guided me through 9 months of training and development within my skills. Still working as a junior, my Manager was an amazing Illustrator and taught me how to really control design skills throughout the Adobe suite software. On my return to the UK, with my now Australian Husband, I then landed a Managerial position within a similar type of business back in Leeds.

Wow, what a journey!
What have been some of your most difficult obstacles in the workplace?

I think the most difficult obstacles within my career are being a Director of Love Layla. While I still love my job as a Designer, running a business involves job roles that I have zero interest in - such as Accounts. It takes me a long time to understand the sums!

Thankfully, I am super organised so can handle the workload but understanding and throwing yourself into duties that you really have no idea (or interest!) about...

What has been your favourite project to work on?
My favourite projects have always been logo design - throughout my career and having various tasks, I still and always will love designing logos! Simply because they are the “emblem” of someone’s business - there’s a lot riding on that. It’s the pressure I love then...

I did feel really proud and loved designing a sign for our offices -the sign is huge and I have never had to design a sign for myself, that was special.

Starting out, how did you create opportunities for yourself?
I always tried to put myself into everything - I always kept up with trends and found my own style. I was fortunate to gain experience within both print and design - this gave me a better understanding of a finished product when I was designing to send to print.

You have a very family orientated brand and business, who would you thank for helping get where you are?
It's true! The biggest input to my career started with my parents - they would drive me crazy places for crazy equipment/tools/materials to create my designs while at Uni. After them, I would say my boss from my job in Sydney. I was only supposed to be a temp for 3 weeks - 9 months later, I left the country and the job along with the support and advice of a professional who had grown her business from scratch.

So, from Leeds to Sydney to Leeds again, what was it that made you create Love Layla?
Love Layla came about because I was made redundant (again) as I left for maternity leave to have my baby, Layla. I was working as a freelance designer when my husband had a back injury. We were left with £30 and a one year old so I used my skills to pay the bills!

I designed 11 cards for Valentine’s Day and pushed them through Social Media. 3 years later, we stand in a warehouse with 4 members of staff (who are all family) with my husband, Jay, also as a Director. Layla is now 4 years old and we have a huge social media following generating repeat and new custom.

  

Amazing! What would you say has been your biggest achievement to date?
While not to sound too cocksure, my biggest achievement is managing Motherhood and building a successful business turning over £1million in our first year of trading. That was a big year and a proud achievement.

Absolutely, that's incredible. Why do you think the North of England is so special?
Yorkshire Puddings - My Dad is the king of them!

I was born and bred in Leeds and I love being in the North because it’s home! With great cities, we have lots to offer - chips and gravy for one!

What is great about Northern creatives?
There are lots of opportunities worldwide for Creatives, but sometimes they aren’t plausible or practical - so Northern Creatives are able to reach out to the North to assure you that you don’t need to be in the capital to have good ideas - nor do you need to have the skyline backdrop for inspiration.

If you have the eye, determination and drive, it will take you where you want to be.

What does the future hold for 2018?
Continue building our business, generate more designs and products to add to our collection and in general, keep enjoying my work and designing.

What advice would you give to anyone entering the creative industry?
Keep going, it’s not easy. I do find sometimes what looks great to you, isn’t always to someone else - but stick with your gut. Believe in what you do and keep practicing. I have gained a lot of skills through watching and practising video tutorials since I left University and through running my business.

Always think outside of the box, sorry for being cliché - It’s not my usual style, but always look for the not so obvious things in life, they might just lead you to a good thing.

One final thing, who is Twat Cat?
(Laughing) That's our cat and he is Twat Cat.

--

Got a birthday, anniversary, wedding to go to? You know where you're going now.
Discover more of our amazing Champion Northern Creatives here.

April 12, 2018 - Comments Off on Stephen Drummond: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 3

Stephen Drummond: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 3

Stop what you're doing. We went knocking on number 70 for a blog with more amazing things than you can shake a stick at. From Samuel L Jackson to puddles - we've got it all. Neatly wrapped into piece for you to love with all your might.

Meet Owner and Creative Director of Drummond Central, a marketing and communications agency based in Newcastle with clients worldwide. They're one of the top 20 largest agencies outside of London and recognised globally for their creative work.

"We love nothing better than raising the profile of cutting-edge, non-traditional and creatively-minded clients through a considered approach."

You might also know them from...

Let's get cracking, what's you're name and where do you come from (proper Cilla intro!)

I'm Stephen, I'm the Creative Director of Drummond Central, I'm from Newcastle (loud cheering from the crowd) and I started my design life out at Newcastle School of Art and design and followed with a HND in Advertising.

After you finished education, what were your next steps?
Went to London for a year or so, starting as a Junior Art Director to now, CD of my own agency.

That's pretty awesome.
What has been some of your most difficult obstacles in the workplace?

Managing a creative department is the most complex part of my day job.

What has been your favourite project to work on?
There's been loads. We made a horse racing TV commercial recently. We duplicated one horse, numerous times to create a pack. That turned out much better than I thought it would. Amazing actually.

How did you create opportunities for yourself?
Hard work and persistance. Make sure you work harder than everyone in the room. Then make sure work you work harder than everyone in the building etc...

How did you get your first job in the industry?
It was Christmas time and we sent our portfolio in wrapping paper to the CD of Saatchi and Saatchi in London. He called us back within 15 minutes.

Amazing! What has been your biggest achievement to date at work?
Filming commercials with Samuel L Jackson at Universal Studios, Hollywood.

WOW! I'm not quite sure how to follow that?
What do you think is special about the North of England?
Everything you could ever need; history, the coast, great nightlife etc... is on the doorstep. Plus, Northern creatives have a good work ethic, they're witty and grounded.

What's your next big goal?
Keep getting better. Have more fun!

What advice would you give to anyone entering the industry?
Work harder than everyone else. Listen!

--

Check out more of Drummond Central's work here.
Read more about our Champion Northern Creatives, here.

April 10, 2018 - Comments Off on sensei

sensei

se. xvi

if you squat and squint real well, you'll see that 'puma' is an anagram of 'faux pas', either that or that's the name of their next line of creps that with 78% likelihood will not sell out

SEE

In total effing awe of this emoji art page - damn these yung kids got skills. There’s not much on this earth that will make you as happy as seeing Kendrick’s cheek made of cookies and Eric Andre’s hair recreated with motorbikes and spiders. For more visual animated wonders available OFF the sociomediosphere and in the big L-D-N instead, check out Frances Stark over at the ICA and a screening of her interpretation of Mozart’s famous opera ‘The Magic Flute’. The behind-the-scenes vid of her work makes for worthwhile watching as she explains how obscure art doesn’t alllllways have to be poncey and inaccessible. (But it sure does help).

TOUCH

MORE THRIFT MAKES THE HEART GROW SCHWIFTY. Poplar Union is starting a monthly sewing class and in the process discards all that ‘make-do-and-mend’ preconceptions you had about the needle-and-thread, and shows you that new skills taste just as good as new clothes. Ones you’ve made yourself, obviously, not sold your soul to the high street (and their questionable exploits) for.

 

HEAR

The sweet sound of drums’n’laughter that you’ve been direly missing since all that endless Easter joy came to an abrupt halt last Tuesday. Hideaway in Streatham not only puts on live jazz, soul and funk nights - laying the aural nectar on so thick they could sell it as manuka - they host comedy nights on Fridays too. Getcho giggle on, forget it’s Friday 13th, shed the week’s sorrows, all that jazz. Literally, jazz. Monday nights sees a jazz workshop and jam session for all abilities, so you with the deaf tones can finally make it to deftones (the Def Jam version).

SMELL

Dance but NOT as you’ve known it before. Which is quite possibly you stepping on your own toes feeling like the physical embodiment of awkwardness, being squashed against a club wall wet with the condensation of fifty gurning 19-year-olds, and not being able to get the stink of said late teenagers out of your nostrils. Check out IDENTITY at Shoreditch Town Hall from the 12th - 14th April; contemporary artists will be exploring identity through voguing, hip hop, krump and generally shaking thangs that should be shook.

TASTE

Ever get caught in that weird conveyor belt-esque hole of Facebook videos that are a satisfying medley of relatable meme lols, the best moments from The Thick of It and unending #FOOD? Well you and me both, brother, we’re like pole and line tuna - reeled in af. Anyway I was doing this recently and somehow through the glaze of “I’ve now watched 25 minutes of disembodied hands prepare meals so swiftly it’s superhuman” that had crystallised over my eyeballs, I paid attention to someone telling me what to order at a Korean BBQ. So, naturally, Korean BBQ has now permeated my every waking thought. Which means I bring you GOGI in Edgware Road (WEST!!!), Asadal in Holborn and Dotori in Finsbury Park. Thx FB, for once.

@larabaxter 

April 5, 2018 - Comments Off on Nick Entwistle: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 2

Nick Entwistle: Champion Northern Creatives: Part 2

From starting his first business working from his dining room table at just 16 with his 12-year-old brother to beating Bieber to a Christmas Number 1, this lad from Stockport has gone from strength to strength, I asked him to sum up his career in just 1-minute:

Meet Nick Entwistle, Creative Director at Trunk and Founder of One Minute Briefs.

Thanks for being in our Champion Northern Creatives. Let's get right in!
After finishing formal education what did you do next?

I had already done numerous work placements during my course so I had a job offer in place for when I left (Liverpool John Moores) University. This was at Driven in Wilmslow working on ads for Vimto, webuyanycar.com, Carcraft amongst other brands.

How has your career path been shaped over the years?

Since then, I left after a couple of years along with my creative partner to take a job at McCann Manchester. Here I spent a few years working on the likes of Aldi, American Airlines, Nestle, Royal Mail, N-Power & Cross Country Trains.

I then left to go freelance for a year working mainly at McCann Birmingham on Miele, Evans Halshaw, Vauxhall and Bentley. I also worked as a CD at Big Brand Ideas. In this time I also worked at Leeds agency Propaganda and Edinburgh agency Leith on Irn Bru.

I then worked freelance at Magnafi as I moved more into film. One of my first jobs was the music video and campaign for the NHS which resulted in us beating Bieber to Xmas Number 1.

I took on a full-time Creative Director role there, working on campaigns for Missguided, Betfred, Very.co.uk and Sofology. And, just recently, I moved to Trunk. We work with agencies to collaborate on making engaging content.

Cool! What has been some of your most difficult obstacles in the workplace?

Processes within some of the bigger agencies can sometimes stifle creativity and stop you being agile and responsive. In today's world, you need to be quick and be able to produce ideas and content fast without getting left behind. This is why I like to work within smaller teams and be involved in the process from start to finish, working with a talented team that works together to make things happen.

What has been your favourite project to work on?

The NHS campaign was very intense but extremely rewarding. To see the campaign grow from a one minute idea into a music video that reached number 1 and got played after the Queen's speech was incredible and something I will never forget. It also put a huge statement out to the powers that be that the public won't let the NHS die.

Amazing! When you first started, how did you create opportunities for yourself?

I think it's important as a creative to have a brand and a point of difference. It's not easy to remember a name. And, you need to get your work seen. I have done this with the Bank of Creativity, Agency Quotes and One Minute Briefs, but it all started with the story below...

When I was 16 and started college, I decided I didn’t want to create a portfolio of work. I decided I was going to run a Graphic Design company.

I called it NE-Design. You know… NE-Time. NE-Place. NE-Idea. Punny right?

But my approach got me noticed. I emailed local companies and sure enough one came along with a brief to redesign their logo and website.

It was a huge engineering firm turning over a lot of money and here was little old me inviting the boss over to the NE-Design ‘office’ which was, in fact, my family’s dining room.

I asked my mum to stay in the kitchen whilst I had the meeting.

When I opened the door to this big CEO, he must have been shocked as I’d given no clue previously to my age. He was in for even more of a shock when I took him through to the office to meet my web developer… who, of course, was my 12-year-old brother.

Some people would have walked out there and then…but we reassured him that we’d create some great work for him.

And, we did. Earning a nice bit of pocket money for ourselves in the process.

By saying I was a business, rather than a college student, I changed the perception of what I was. And this became who I was. Because you are who you say you are.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. The most important work you do is the work you do to get people to look at the work you do.

Love it - This might be the best start-up story I've ever heard!
Who would you thank for helping get where you are?

Gary Fawcett of TBWA Manchester was a big help for me. I had a book crit with him. At the time, he couldn't give me a job, but he gave me loads of contacts and one of them was Driven. I still speak to Gary to this day and I think it's very important to keep in touch and remain thankful to people who get you where you are. I thank the tutors from uni. The course was a very good one as you didn't see your tutor for ten mins once every two weeks. They helped you as much as possible and pushed you to be industry ready by getting out there.

I'd thank the Creative Directors at all the agencies I have worked for pushing me to create better work and I'd thank Simon Lewis and Jon Butler for giving me the opportunities to take on Creative Director roles with them. I'd also thank my good friend Adam Britton who I work closely with at Trunk now as we look to achieve great things. There have been plenty more people along the way too, especially the OMBLES. Without them, One Minute Briefs wouldn't exist. It's become an incredible community of people who help each other creatively and as friends.

Absolutely! Let's talk more about One Minute Briefs, how did you originally come up with the idea/concept for OMB?

It started when we had about 7 weeks on a uni project. As we all know, that's unrealistic in industry. And, I don't work well with long deadlines. So, of course, myself and my creative partner decided to try and crack a brief in One Minute!

One of us did a good one. One of us did a shit one. Which was great as we realised you can actually come up with a good idea when you're thinking is restricted by time but at the same time de-restricted as you can put anything down on the paper.

It was also a lot of fun and our course mates started to get involved. We then put it on Twitter and opened up to the public by setting a brief every day. Slowly but surely, people started to get involved and the community has grown to 15.5 thousand followers in the last few years.

What has been your biggest work/OMB achievement to date?

The NHS campaign was a big one but I feel that the viral Isabella C-word film we recently created is the biggest. From a one minute idea, we were able to write a script for a film featuring Neuroblastoma sufferer Isabella herself.

The film has been seen by over 20 million people and featured in national press and TV news coverage. It has also raised tens of thousands of pounds towards her target. Could one minute help save someone's life? That would be the best achievement ever.
By combining the expertise of our team along with the support of the OMBLES, we were able to achieve something great together as a team.

What do you think is special about the North of England?

We don't have to get the Tube! That's the main thing. The North is great as we have got some great agencies producing quality work. We don't get the budgets London agencies do but that just means it's more of a challenge.

I'm from the North and have had opportunities to go to London but I like it here. We have the best football teams here in Manchester too. Particularly my beloved Man City!

I'm a firm believer that great work can be produced anywhere and with the transport links and technology available these days, I don't see why that shouldn't be here.

What has been your experience with working in a traditional team?

Traditional agencies are sometimes set in their ways and can't adapt to new technology and respond to opportunities quickly. That's why I like to work with people who have the same mindset and are always looking to create something new and make a difference within the industry.

What's your next big goal? What does the future hold for 2018?

I am making a film for Multiple Sclerosis sufferers which I want to have big reach and create an impact this year. I've created an OMBoard as I look to push One Minute Briefs even bigger.

And, I want to create some amazing work with the Trunk team.

What advice would you give to anyone entering the industry?

• Create a brand for yourself.
• Stand out from the other graduates. They are your rivals.
• Don't wait until you graduate to make contacts.
• Believe in yourself.
• Do great work.
• Make Creative Directors wish they had thought of the ideas you are showing them.

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Want to read more of our Northern Creatives series? Check our Part 1 from Michelle Pegg.